Bear Crawl Step-by-step and 5 challenging Exercises

How to do bear crawl exercise - FITZABOUT

A Bear Crawl is a Intermediate level exercise which is commonly used in CrossFit Workouts, Bootcamp style workouts, Spartan Training, and also in High Intensity Training protocols.

The total body movement challenges nearly all your muscle groups including the ones in your lower body, upper body, core, and may also help improve performance in a wide range of sports.

Apart from boosting your metabolism, this exercise is one of the most effective tricks. But the “Bear Crawl” movement is not for everyone. Exercisers should be in good health and have some fitness experience before attempting this movement.

After you finish, the muscles of the whole body will be burning because your knees cannot touch the ground, so the pressure on your upper body remains constant. Ready to give it a try?

Steps to do Bear Crawl exercise

  • Start the bear crawl in a push-up position with hands should be beneath the shoulders. And your shoulders stacked over wrists and hip directly over knees.
  • Your lats (the muscles on your back below your armpits that you’d feel if you gave yourself a hug), the core is engaged and maintain a neutral spine. Feet should be hip-distance apart with hover your knees slightly off the floor.
  • Now, start moving forward, moving the right arm and left leg with a crawling motion.
  • Then, immediately after placing the weight on the right arm and left leg, switch sides and move the left arm and right leg forward.
  • Keep the body relatively low and you continue in a crawling motion. Imagine you are crawling under a low net.
  • Move forward for steps 5-7, then take a short break and repeat three more times. Reverse the movement to return to start. It is one repetition.

Performing mistakes

There are some common blunders that are often seen while doing kickback exercises.

Lifting the hips high into the air

It is natural to let your hips rise as the bear crawls along. After a few creep steps, the arms are exhausted and lifting the hips high into the air helps reduce tension in your core and upper body. But it also reduces the amount of work your body does to reduce the effectiveness of exercise.

As long as you move your body forward, try to keep the back completely flat. Imagine that you are balancing a bowl of water on a small part of your back as you walk. If you still lift your hips, try the modification below where you practice holding a tabletop position off the ground.

Maintain solid state

Bear crawl is a great core exercise, but if you don’t do your back sag or drop.

Before you start moving, try to cut your core so that the hips and shoulders are in a straight line. The head should not fall forward or down. Maintain this solid state as you walk. It is helpful to see yourself in the mirror. A friend or instructor of yours can also see you and provide feedback.

If you have a hard time maintaining a solid core while moving, practice grabbing the tabletop. Or just go a few steps forward and move slowly as you become stronger.

Maintain the movement under torso

As you move forward, all try to maintain the movement under your torso. If you notice stealthily in the armpit to crawl your legs forward, you can take steps that are too large. Likewise, if you see your hips moving, you can take steps that are too big. You may also lack core strength.

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Benefits of Bear Crawl

The movements will probably feel awkward at first, because they are not familiar, but stick with it because this practice gives results! You will include bear crawl in your workout routine due to the following several benefits:

1. Boosting creative engagement

While some regular exercisers are content to walk on a treadmill, climb an elliptical, or paddle on a long-running exercise bike, many people get bored after a while and some even give up their hard workout. In fact, loss of interest is often cited as the reason why exercisers abandon their programs.

But SARQ-type programs increase creative engagement with the equipment, allow you to move more fully into the gym space, and encourage engagement between participants. For example, teams may compete against each other to complete exercises such as bear crawls, pull-ups, rope exercises and other full-body movements.[1]

SARQ stands for speed, agility, responsiveness and quickness. These workouts were reserved for professional athletes, members of the military or police forces, and other elite sports participants[2].

Studies have shown that such workout models encourage adherence to an exercise program [3]. Most people who have tried these workouts will also tell you that time flies as you move from activity to activity and connect with fellow peers.

2. At a time target multiple muscle groups

Research has confirmed that lack of time is a common reason why people avoid exercise or abandon their exercise program. But most of us do not need a study to confirm this fact [4]. Anyone with a busy life knows that when the demands arise from your job, your family and your social life, your workout often ends at the back burner.

Compound exercises like bear crawl help you to get more benefits in less time. The compound movements are exercises that work multiple muscle groups at the same time. For example, attending a bear crawl session for 1-2 minutes can work your abdominal muscles, chest, shoulders, and lower body.

As a result, you do not need to spend time doing individual exercises to target all those physical areas. You can also include jump crawls such as jumping jacks and push-ups to complete 5-minute mini-workouts throughout the day.

3. Lower body and core muscles

While the weight of the body goes into the arms and shoulders, the legs and buttocks are pulling towards you, so you will definitely feel it in your feet. You also need a pretty strong core to move the bear crawl across the floor to properly coordinate the legs and arms.

Learning how to bear crawl is a great way to engage internal oblique and transverse abdominus – the muscles in your core that help keep your abdomen tight and your pelvis and spine in the proper posture to keep straight. The reason for this is that bear crawls require control and stabilization while walking!

4. Burn more calories

It is difficult to move your entire body weight on the floor! Bear Crawl will help your heart pump and your body burn calories. As much as this step will strengthen your muscles, it is also a great cardio exercise.

5 challenging Exercises

5 Bear Crawl challenging Exercises - FITZABOUT
5 challenging Exercises

Here are the top 5 bear crawl challenging exercises you may not have done before. Ises For the duration of the exercise, do not allow your lower back to hyper-extend, the ribs to flatten, the torso, spine, or hips to rotate, the weight from foot to foot, or the pike or collapse of the hips.

Tip iin the context of breathing: In the context of breathing, do the work that feels best and best for you.

1. Bird Dog Bear Crawl Combo

This deceptively difficult exercise improves lumbo-pelvic stability, shoulder and scapular controlled mobility (which is moving), and stability (On the planted side). ide apart from his moving arm and leg. The rest of your body should remain in a relatively stable position for the duration of the exercise.breathing, do the work that feels best and best for you.

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How to do:

  • Start with the bear crawl position. Your head, torso and hips should be in a standing position.
  • Place your thighs so that they are in a vertical position, bend your knees, and place them a few inches above the floor.
  • Your shoulders should be above your hands. Spread your fingers and pretend that you are suctioning them on the floor.
  • Take a deep breath before performing each rep (360 degrees of air around your spine), brace your core (360 degrees brace around your spine), tuck your ribs towards your hips (close the space in your mid-section), and squeeze your glutes.
  • Now lead with your heel, and extend one leg backwards, and at the same time forward with your opposite hand. Stop for a count while you are in this extended position. Return your hands and feet to the starting position.
  • Do not raise your arm or leg too much as this can cause your spine to go into hyperextend. There is often a good height parallel to the floor.
  • One of the main purposes of this exercise is to generate tension throughout the body, contracting your lat, building the muscles around your shoulder blades, arms and legs.
  • On the planted side, do not move out of mind. Push your body away from the floor and stretch your shoulder blades (move it away from your spine and around your ribs).

2. ⁣Renegade Rows From Bear Crawl

This exercise improves lumbo-pelvic stability, shoulder and scapular controlled mobility (which side is moving), and stability (On the planted side), and to some extent, upper body strength. Apart from moving arm/shoulder blade, the rest of your body should remain in a relatively stable position for the duration of the exercise.

How to do:

  • Get into a bear crawl position. Your head, torso and hips should be in a standing position.
  • Place your thighs so that they are in a vertical position, bend your knees, and place them a few inches above the floor.
  • Your shoulders should be above your hands.
  • Take a deep breath before performing each rep (360 degrees of air around your spine), brace your core (360 degrees brace around your spine), tuck your ribs towards your hips (close the space in your mid-section), and squeeze your glutes.
  • Perform one hand row. Start the movement using the muscles in your middle and upper back and pull your shoulder blades towards your spine (retract).
  • In the top position, do not allow your elbow to flare out.
  • Reduce weight to the starting position with control. Your shoulder blades should perform a reverse movement (protrusion), as happened during the rowing/concentric component. Think of moving your shoulder blades away from your spine and around your ribs. Do not keep it pinup.
  • Pay attention to your non-working/supportive side. Push away from the dumbbell and spread your shoulder blade (remove it from around your spine and your ribs).

3. Jumping Push-Up Bear Crawl Combo

This exercise improves upper body strength, lumbo-pelvic stability and shoulder and scapular controlled mobility.

How to do:

  • Get into a bear crawl position. Your head, torso and hips should be in a standing position.
  • Place your thighs so that they are in a vertical position, bend your knees, and place them a few inches above the floor.
  • Your shoulders should be almost above your hands. Spread your fingers and pretend that you are suctioning them on the floor.
  • Take a deep breath before performing each rep (360 degrees of air around your spine), brace your core (360 degrees brace around your spine), tuck your ribs towards your hips (close the space in your mid-section), and squeeze your glutes.
  • Now jump forward with your hands, extend your hips and legs, and land in a push-up. As you are landing in a push-up, retract your shoulder blades.
  • In the downward position, your elbow should be on your wrist, and in a vertical position forward. Do not let your elbows flare.
  • Once your upper arms are nearly parallel (or slightly closer) to the floor, explode off the floor with your upper body, and return to the initial bear crawl position. Aim to get as much air time as you can.
  • When you are pushing your body away from the floor, spread your shoulder blades.
  • Land as tenderly as possible, and maintain proper push-up form.
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4. Plate Slides From Bear Crawl

This exercise improves lumbo-pelvic stability, shoulder and scapular controlled mobility (on moving side), and stability (On the planted side). Apart from moving arm/shoulder blade. Your body should remain in a fixed position for the duration of the exercise.

How to do:

  • Get into a bear crawl position. Your head, torso and hips should be in a standing position.
  • Place your thighs so that they are in a vertical position, bend your knees, and place them a few inches above the floor.
  • Your shoulders should be above your hands. Spread your fingers and pretend that you are suctioning them on the floor.
  • Place a weight plate on one side of your body, and so it is directly below your shoulder.
  • Take a deep breath before performing each rep (360 degrees of air around your spine), brace your core (360 degrees brace around your spine), tuck your ribs towards your hips (close the space in your mid-section), and squeeze your glutes.
  • Now move the weight plate in the opposite direction of your body. Repeat using the opposite arm.
  • Pay attention to your non-working/supportive side. Push away from the floor and your shoulder blades (take it away from your spine and around your ribcage). Do not hang out unnecessarily.

5. ⁣Band Resisted Bear Crawls

This exercise improves lumbo-pelvic stability, shoulder and scapular controlled mobility (moving to the side), and stability (on the planted side).

How to do:

  • Put a resistance band around a secure surface, and place the band around your hips. There must be a significant amount of resistance in the band for 100% of the exercise.
  • Get into a bear crawl position. Your head, torso and hips should be in a standing position.
  • Place your thighs so that they are in a vertical position, bend your knees, and place them a few inches above the floor.
  • Your shoulders should be above your hands. Spread your fingers and pretend that you are suctioning them on the floor.
  • Take a deep breath before performing each rep (360 degrees of air around your spine), brace your core (360 degrees brace around your spine), tuck your ribs towards your hips (close the space in your mid-section), and squeeze your glutes.
  • Crawl forward and perform several steps per side. Then do a reverse movement and crawl backwards.
  • On the planted side, do not move out of mind. Push your body away from the floor and stretch your shoulder blades (move it away from your spine and around your ribs).

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Amit kumar - ceo & founder fitzabout

Written by Amit Kumar. He is a certified Yoga Instructor; Diploma in sports & exercise and nutrition; Diploma in fitness and weight loss; Diploma in Nutrition; Diploma in Nutrition, Food, Science and Menu Planning.

Article Sources +
  1. Anderson, C. B. (2003). When more is better: number of motives and reasons for quitting as correlates of physical activity in women Health Education Research, 18(5), 525–537. doi:10.1093/her/cyf01401[]
  2. Benefits of Agility Training for Non-athletes. By Pete McCall, on September 22, 2014[]
  3. Whiteman-sandland J, Hawkins J, Clayton D. Journal of Health Psychology-The role of social capital and community belongingness for exercise adherence: An exploratory study of the CrossFit gym model. 2018;23(12):1545-1556. doi:10.1177/1359105316664132[]
  4. https://ijbnpa.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1479-5868-9-78[]

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